Tips for Special Education High School Students Heading to College

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Tips for Special Education High School Students Heading to College

Tips for Special Education High School Students Heading to College | NAV Law

Any high school student hoping to go to college is sure to be busy at least during the last two years of high school. College preparation requires standardized tests, applications for scholarships and financial assistance and plenty of forms, paperwork, and applications. The process is even more difficult for special education students who may find it difficult to break physical or mental barriers created by their unique needs. Some of these students may be tempted to give up if they do not receive the necessary push to take the next step.

It is encouraging to note that all public high schools in the United States are required to provide teaching that will help special needs students to transition to post-secondary institutions as easily as possible. In addition, all special needs students who are 16 years old or above are required to receive vocational and practical living training as part of their IEPs. Parents and guidance counselors working with these students should be aware of resources available to them that will ease the transition from high school to college.

Support for Special Education Beyond High School

Many colleges and vocational schools throughout the United States offer specialized support to special needs students with learning disabilities. Many quality institutions, such as the University of Washington, Beacon College, and Landmark College, provide specialty management for students who have ADD, ADHD or other learning disorders. Some provide special instructions for professors to aid the students while others provide specialty programs for this population in such mainstream majors as business management, human services, psychology and more. Some mainstream colleges and public universities offer student advisors and small student-to-teacher ratios.

Special needs students who struggle with physical limitations are certainly not left behind on the road to higher education. The Americans with Disabilities Act ensures that students attending colleges and universities must have accessible buildings, including the classrooms, dormitories, offices and other facilities. Many colleges are willing to relocate classes, provide records of notes for those unable to take class notes and give disabled students self-care helpers for after school hours.

Despite all these changes that have been made on college campuses, some current high school students may feel that they are excluded from mainstream education. Attorneys at Newman Aaronson Vanaman are willing to help parents and students work through these difficulties to ensure that special education students are not facing a bias.
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