Can Schools Really Help with Emotional Support Goals?

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Can Schools Really Help with Emotional Support Goals?

Can Schools Really Help with Emotional Support Goals? | LA Special Education

When you think of your child’s Individualized Education Plan, commonly called an IEP, you most likely think of the academic goals listed on it. While school is certainly the ideal place to be working on academic knowledge and skills, your children should be learning much more there. They need to learn how to get along with others, take tests, talk to teachers, and manage their emotions. These adjunct needs are particularly important for special education students who often struggle with the academic portion of school if ancillary goals are not met first.

Including Emotional Goals in the IEP

The good news is that your child’s IEP can and should contain emotional goals. If the current year’s plan has no emotional goals on it, you should definitely request an IEP meeting with the school district. If you are having trouble finding these goals on your child’s IEP, try looking for them under the social/emotional section of the document.

Emotional needs can take a variety of forms depending on the child. For some children, extreme shyness and nervousness can keep them from asking questions in class or from coming to the teacher with specific needs. Other children have difficulty socializing with their peers and may respond by spending most of their time alone or by striking out at their classmates.

Addressing Emotional & Social Needs

These and other emotional and social needs can be addressed in several ways. Your child may benefit from certain accommodations that allow him to remain in the general classroom with peers. Others require direct instruction from adjunct professionals who can help them move past certain concerns.

Some of the types of professionals who you may see listed on your child’s IEP include psychiatrists, psychologists, and speech and language pathologists. These professionals work one-on-one with your child weekly or perhaps several times per week. They can help your child learn to talk to and interact with others. They can also teach special needs children certain conflict resolution solutions that will help them respond positively even during negative times.

By addressing the emotional and social needs that your special needs child has, school can become a wholesome and welcoming place that improves his mind and readies him for the future. If you need help working on an IEP or deciding what emotional goals should be on the IEP, contact an attorney from Newman, Aaronson, Vanaman today.

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