Special Education Resources for Social Skills

The Art of Negotiation
September 7, 2018
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What Are Related Services?
September 24, 2018

Special Education Resources for Social Skills

Special Education Resources for Social Skills | Los Angeles Special Education

Some special needs children struggle to develop good social skills that allow them to interact well with their peers. Not only do social skills help these children feel as if they are part of a community, but also they help them avoid being teased and bullied by their peers. Social skills are those skills that help people interact well. With the proper skills, children should be able to make friends well, interact appropriately with peers and carry on conversations. These skills should be adaptable to many situations, and thus they require many parts of the mind to work together swiftly at any given time.

Social Skills in the Classroom

Children with autism are often those most likely to struggle with social skills in the special needs classroom. However, these and other similar children who struggle to make or maintain friendships are frequently not receiving the social skills help that they need in school. Because this is truly a functional skill needed to survive well in life, it is something that should be covered by the IEP by the school district. If you feel that your child has been written off by the school district and is not receiving the support he or she needs in this area, we encourage you to revisit the subject by calling a new IEP meeting.

You are a vital part of the IEP team, and you have just as much of a say in matters as the teachers and school administrators do. Usually, you know your child better than these professionals do and will have insight into what your child needs to succeed. Do not let the school district try to get away with an hour or two of counseling for your child every month. Instead, your child will need more hands-on help with this matter. Otherwise, he or she will have a hard time over the remaining school years.

Therapy and coaching are both excellent tools to help your child learn how to respond in certain social situations. Struggling children should be able to try role-playing and should be able to be a part of certain activities with peers that will help them get their feet wet in new social scenarios. If your school district is not doing its part and you are unable to make it budge in its decisions, try getting help from a special education attorney at Newman, Aaronson, Vanaman.
What Are Related Services?
The Art of Negotiation