Tips for Dealing with a New Special Education Teacher

Online Schooling for Special Education | Los Angeles County Special Education
Online Schooling for Special Education
November 10, 2017
Common Core for Special Education | Los Angeles County Special Education
Common Core for Special Education
November 24, 2017

Tips for Dealing with a New Special Education Teacher

Tips for Dealing with a New Special Education Teacher | Los Angeles County

Dealing with a new teacher can be rough for any child but is even harder for a special education child. These children often struggle with insecurities and worry that their new teachers will have different requirements for them or will have personalities that will not mesh with theirs. However, since the parent-child-teacher relationship is three-sided, there are a variety of ways that parents can help their children adjust to new teachers and can help new teachers understand them and their children.

Meet Them First

To relieve first day jitters for children, parents can take children to an open house at the school or can request a meeting with the new teacher before the first day that he or she begins. This meeting will give children a chance to get to know the teacher and will allow parents to tell the teacher about their children, such as their strengths, weakness, dislikes and personality traits.

Discuss the IEP

This meeting may be a good time to discuss the goals written in the child’s IEP. Just because there is a new teacher does not mean that the child’s goals can be left in the dust. An IEP review meeting can be held anytime during the year when parents request one.

Let Children Share

After meeting the new teacher, children should be given a safe space to share their concerns or their joys about the teacher. Having this conversation can show children that parents are on their sides and can do much to relieve anxiety.

Keep a Communication Log

Parents should keep track of all communication with the new teacher, including phone calls, notes, emails and parent-teacher meetings. This communication may come in handy in the future if problems arise.

While most new teachers begin at the start of the school year, new teacher jitters can crop up in the middle of the school year if the student changes classrooms, has a substitute teacher or experiences a permanent change made by the school district. While these changes can be difficult for parents and children, these situations are certainly workable with some patience and a great deal of communication. Parents and special education students who do not feel that things are going well for them in their schools should contact an attorney from Newman, Aaronson, Vanaman who is an expert in special education law.
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