Tips for Parents to Address Bullying

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Tips for Parents to Address Bullying

Tips for Parents to Address Bullying | LA County Special Education

Bullying can happen to any child of any age, gender, size, socioeconomic level or family background. However, children who have certain disabilities are more likely to be picked on by their peers because other school children do not feel that this child fits in easily with their group. It can be difficult for parents to know whether their child has been bullied if the child does not feel confident enough to report it to them as soon as it happens. However, many children display certain signs, such as failing greats, a sudden lack of interest in previously enjoyable activities and depression that may indicate that all is not right at school.

When parents do find out about the bullying, they may be tempted to rush right into the fray with guns blazing to ensure that their child is never hurt verbally, physically or emotionally again. This is typically not the best way to deal with this situation though because it can do more harm than good, leaving the child more open to bullying than ever. Plus, parents will not have documentation of what has happened or what has been done to correct the situation.

What to Do When Bully Happens

The best option is to get everything in writing to leave a paper trail. Parents must notify school officials about the bullying in a letter that is mailed via certified mail or dropped off at the school office and signed for by the secretary, principal or superintendent. It is wise to discuss exactly what the child has reported to the parents and to remind the school of federal and state laws that protect the rights of children with disabilities who are attending school. In particular, parents can cite Section 104 from the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the Americans with Disabilities Amendment Act from 2008.

It is certainly difficult to find out that your child has been bullied in school. However, parents have plenty of good options for dealing with the problem and protecting their children. Parents can also work with a special needs attorney from Newman, Aaronson, Vanaman Attorneys at Law to get quick and direct attention to their concerns. By choosing us to be on your side, you can be certain that the school district will hear your concerns and make changes to protect your child and other students from further bullying.

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